Articles Posted in Land Use & Entitlements

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Advice from a Proposition 65 Compliance & Defense lawyer for hotels.

For many years, businesses operating in California have been plagued by “bounty hunter” and government lawsuits brought under Proposition 65 — the California law that requires warnings about hazardous substances. The technical disclosure requirements have bedeviled many legitimate businesses for some time. From our continuous interaction with members of the hotel industry, it appears to us that many are not aware of new requirements they must meet by August 30, 2018.

While the new regulations apply generally to all businesses in California, there are particular implications for hotels and restaurants given the nature of their operations. And if you are not in compliance by August 30, 2018, you can probably expect a lawsuit shortly thereafter. We expect these new requirements to stir up a lot of expensive litigation for the unprepared.

In this article, Jodi Smith, a senior member of JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group®, explains this significant development.

California Proposition 65 Warnings for Hotels
Required by August 30, 2018
by
Proposition 65 Defense Lawyer Jodi Smith

New Prop 65 regulations for hotels going into effect. The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (better known as “Proposition 65” or “Prop 65”) requires companies conducting business in California to warn consumers prior to exposing consumers to specific chemicals that have been identified pursuant to Proposition 65 as being chemicals known to cause cancer or birth defects or other reproductive harm.  The Proposition 65 regulations were substantially revised in August 2016 and the new regulations go into effect on August 30, 2018.  The new warnings can be used now.  Given the complexity of the new warning requirements for hotels, getting a head start would be prudent.

What’s a hotel for Prop 65 purposes? The new regulations require the owner and/or operator of a hotel to determine which of a number of different types of warnings may be required under the new regulations.  “Hotel” is defined broadly to include “any type of transient lodging establishment, including but not limited to, hotels, motels, bed and breakfast inns, resorts, spas, ski resorts, guest ranches, agricultural “homestays”, tourist homes, condominiums, timeshares, vacation home rentals, and extended stay establishments in which members of the public can obtain transient lodging accommodations.”  (Title 27 California Code of Regulations (CCR) § 25607.32(a))

Warnings required for registration desk or online. The Proposition 65 warning must either (1) be provided on a sign posted at the hotel’s registration desk in no smaller than 22-point type in a location where it will be likely to be seen, read, and understood prior to the completion of the registration or check-in process, or (2) provided to the hotel guest in electronic (directly or via a hyperlink) or hard copy form in the same size type as other consumer information prior to, or during the registration or check-in process.  (27 CCR § 25607.32.(b))  In addition, if written or electronic consumer information is given to hotel guests during the registration or check-in process in any language other than English, the warning must be given in both English and that language.  (27 CCR § 25607.32(c)) CONTINUE READING →

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Author of www.HotelLawBlog.com
3 January 2007
Hotel Lawyer — Top Picks of 2006. Yes, 2006 has been a record year for many in the hospitality industry, and for the hotel lawyers at Jeffer, Mangels, Butler & Marmaro LLP. As we have already given our Outlook for 2007, we thought it might be interesting to look back on our Top Pick articles from 2006 from www.HotelLawBlog.com.

The Top Picks articles are organized by the major TOPICS on the Blog. We generally tried to select just the top two or three articles for each TOPIC. It was a major struggle to decide where to make the cutoff. If you want more information on a particular TOPIC, you can go to www.HotelLawBlog.com, and search for all articles on that TOPIC. To do that, just scroll down the right hand side, and below the (free) subscription and RSS Feed buttons is the Browse search engine that enables you to sort by TOPIC (or date, or key words, etc.).

Here they are . . .

CONTINUE READING →