Articles Posted in Hotel Finance − Hotel Debt & Hotel Equity

Published on:

20 February 2021

See how JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® can help you.
Click here for the latest articles on Hotel Finance.

Hotel finance lawyer: PACE Financing is now mainstream

About five years ago, my partner David Sudeck, a senior member of JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group®, spoke at a hotel industry conference about the attractive features of PACE financing as an innovative financing technique. David has extensive experience with virtually all kinds of real estate financing from senior debt to joint ventures. At the time, he had just finished working on a hotel financing that included components of a senior construction loan from a private lender, Mello Roos community facilities district financing, EB-5 financing, and PACE Financing. Few people in the audience at the conference had heard about PACE financing, and there were a lot of questions about its characteristics.

Over the past five years, PACE financing has gained wider acceptance, and moved from a novel or creative technique to a widely-accepted practical solution to financings. It has gained traction with both lenders and borrowers. But its gradual increasing use was accelerated by the COVID pandemic and resulting lockdowns, and near collapse in many segments of the hospitality industry. The accompanying deficiency of construction and other financing since March 2020, supercharged the importance and use of PACE Financing. Over the past few months alone, David Sudeck and his team have worked, on the lender and borrower-side of transactions, on more than a dozen PACE financing transactions. The largest that we have worked on, more than $40 million of PACE financing, closed just a few weeks ago.

At this point, most owners and developers are considering PACE financing as part of their capital stack for development, for renovation, and for rescue capital (more on this below). And more and more lenders have been approving PACE as a part of the capital stack. Why, you ask?

Why PACE financing can be attractive:

PACE financing takes the form of a voluntary tax assessment on real property, having the same features and priority as an ad valorem real property tax (typically paid only twice per year, when real property taxes are paid). Here are some of the features that may be negotiated which can make it attractive financing: CONTINUE READING →

Published on:

19 February 2021

See how JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® can help you.
Click here for the latest articles on Hotel Finance.

The Global Hospitality Group® just hosted a very timely webinar discussing the state of the hotel and CMBS industries. Our program featured senior representatives from Argentic, Greystone, and Situs – three of the largest CMBS special servicers with the most distressed hotel debt – as well as leading data and analytics firm Trepp, HREC’s runway capital program, Manhattan Hospitality for hotel industry perspectives, and our own hospitality workouts and receivership expert to break down the current state of the distressed hotels market and CMBS special servicing.

Two of our panelists, Jack Westergom of Manhattan Hospitality Advisors and Manus Clancy of analytics firm Trepp, presented slides packed with useful information, and we wanted to make them available to those who were not able to attend the program. Jack’s update on the state of hotel industry, and Manus’ state of the CMBS industry presentation are both available for download below.

CONTINUE READING →

Published on:

01 April 2020

See how JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® can help you.
Click here for the latest articles on distressed hotel loans and here for The Lenders Handbook for Troubled Hotels.

Alternative Strategies
for Troubled Hotel Mortgage Loans
by
Jim Butler
JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group®

When a hotel loan gets in trouble, a lender should immediately perform a Comprehensive Situation Analysis. Borrowers should do the same and be fast to approach lenders with candor and an actual plan demonstrating what is needed and how it will work.

This Comprehensive Situation Analysis is the foundation for making some of the most important decisions that the lender and borrower will face on what to do with a distressed loan or asset.

When the Comprehensive Situation Analysis is completed, what’s next? What do the amassed facts indicate? How do they tell the parties what to do? What are the alternatives for dealing with a troubled hotel loan?

Basically, the alternatives for a lender with troubled hotel asset are:

    1. Do nothing (or sell the loan)
    2. Workout the loan
    3. Appoint a receiver
    4. Seek a deed-in-lieu
    5. Commence foreclosure
    6. Seek Relief in bankruptcy proceedings

The matrix below shows how many of the relevant factors will suggest the appropriate alternative to select.

Please let me know if you have seen any significant considerations we have missed.

CONTINUE READING →

Published on:

30 March 2020

See how JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® can help you.
Click here for the latest articles on distressed hotel loans and here for The Lenders Handbook for Troubled Hotels.

The Comprehensive Situation Analysis should have gathered and considered all the relevant factors concerning the distressed hotel loan documents, the borrower, the hotel and their related considerations. Now it is time to consider these in light of the lender’s goals and the available alternatives. Given the complexities of the typical Special Asset, it is sometimes helpful to boil it down to a summary form that may over-simplify, but at least provides a grid or framework for analysis.

Over the years, I developed an analytical tool that we call “Butler’s Matrix” and it is set forth below: CONTINUE READING →

Published on:

23 March 2020

See how JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® can help you.
Click here for the latest articles on distressed hotel loans and here for The Lenders Handbook for Troubled Hotels.

The Comprehensive Situation Analysis
for Troubled Hotel Loans
by
Jim Butler
JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group®

When Special Assets Teams and special servicers see troubled hotel loans coming onto their screens, they should quickly perform a “Comprehensive Situation Analysis.” The Comprehensive Situation Analysis forms the critical foundation for a lender choosing among its alternative strategies of workout, receivership, deed in lieu or bankruptcy (seeking involuntary bankruptcy and appointment of a trustee).

What is included in the Comprehensive Situation Analysis? Read on!

Early Warning System

For the same reason a lender needs access to information, it needs an excellent early warning system. In addition to obvious items such as a default under a franchise agreement or material contract, knowledgeable industry people are likely to know or be able to detect when a geographic area, market segment or particular hotel is getting into trouble-long before it shows up in the profit and loss statement. A decrease in inventories, failure to maintain the property, a cutback in marketing and other changes in the annual plan, budget, and marketing plan may all be early warning signs. Many prudent lenders have consultants watch their asset portfolios for significant trends and changes that indicate problems. The Special Assets Team should become involved early in the process. But special assets generally also require availability and advice from industry-savvy consultants and counsel.

Without good early warning systems, lenders are being surprised by borrowers calling to say, “We are giving the property back. Payroll is due Friday, and there isn’t any money in the account. . .” Lenders cannot rely on last quarter’s budgets or projections. They need current information to avoid these nasty surprises.

Information Update

The concept of updating all information for troubled hotel assets is the same as for any troubled assets. However, in the case of a hotel, one will typically look for items such as hotel franchise agreements and amendments, management agreements and amendments, any agreements, leases and other arrangements with golf pros, concessionaires and the like, recreational use agreements for golf, tennis, aquatics, equestrian or other amenities, and tax information and returns including occupancy, sales and use, employment, personal property and real property taxes. A checklist approach is helpful.

CONTINUE READING →

Published on:

19 March 2020

See how JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® can help you.
Click here for the latest articles on distressed hotel loans and here for The Lenders Handbook for Troubled Hotels.
Hotel industry crisis: 8 Do’s and Don’ts
for distressed hotels
by
Jim Butler and Guy Maisnik
JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group®

As the COVID-19 crisis grows in the US and elsewhere outside China, hotels and restaurants are among the businesses hardest hit. In select markets like Seattle and San Francisco, hotels are reporting single digit occupancies and crushed ADRs. Many hotels do not have the cash flow to keep their doors open. The major hotel companies are talking of furloughs for tens of thousands of hotel employees and many properties are looking at closure or skeleton team maintenance operations.

This is a time for those with troubled hotel assets to “get back to the basics”.  Here is our time-tested list of Do’s and Don’t’s for distressed hotels and other special assets closely intertwined with operating businesses. There is a wealth of such materials available at HotelLawyer.com.

Here is our updated take on the 8 Dos and Don’ts for distressed hotels. If you just got a notice that your hotel asset is about to lay off staff and close, jump to #4 in the list below and then circle back.

1. Prevention.

Prevention is the first step in a well-planned approach to troubled hotel loans. Proper underwriting, documentation and provisions for access to information may help a lender facing a troubled loan. In the event the loan does get into trouble, the lender will be in a stronger position to protect its interests. Prevention includes careful underwriting of the collateral and the borrower. In underwriting the borrower, the lender should obviously look to the usual credit report and financial statements, but should often go beyond them to get a better feel for the borrower’s reputation, character, fortitude, expertise, consistency and creativity. The lender should ask: Has this borrower built or managed this kind of project before? Are the market and feasibility studies realistic? Are the projections consistent with these factors and do they provide adequately for a “worst case scenario”? Even on non-recourse loans, personal guarantees with “bad boy” carve-outs help assure borrow cooperation when things turn bad.

Once the credit decision has been made, the transaction should be fully and carefully documented with prevention in mind. Use the checklist approach to be sure nothing is overlooked. (JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® uses our proprietary HIT List – acronym for “Hospitality Investment Task” list.) Be sure all desired title and liability insurance is in place, with endorsements to cover the lender’s interests. Particularly with construction loans, negotiate all necessary controls for the project – to cover both the ordinary course of building and the possibility of default. A lender will never have a better opportunity to protect its interests than the period before it has disbursed the loan proceeds.

2. Monitoring and early warning.

Information control is paramount. A lender must carefully monitor its loans until they are paid off. All documents and information needs to be gathered in one centralized place for security, analysis and continuous monitoring. Early warning systems should be established to alert the lender to problems with the borrower, the collateral, or the project’s feasibility. Is the property considering closing or layoffs? Is the construction or marketing of the project being delayed? Is the property being wasted? Are materials disappearing from the job site? Have the demographics and economics of the market changed adversely? If trouble signs appear, the special asset group should be consulted at an early stage, even if the project stays in the hands of the loan servicing department.

Many institutions have been “bitten” by their good faith efforts in a workout situation. The pre-workout agreement is designed to minimize these risks. CONTINUE READING →

Published on:

17 March 2020

See how JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® can help you.
Click here for the latest articles on distressed hotel loans, here for The Lenders Handbook for Troubled Hotels, and here for articles on the coronavirus.

 

Hotel owners, operators and lenders are under stress – hotel defaults, layoffs, and shutdowns loom. Prompt action is critical.

For the last three to five years the pundits have increasingly speculated that the longest economic recovery in history could not endure and that we were due for a recession. We hope that the extraordinary measures being taken now may defer some of the worst fears, but clearly the US economy has been plunged into distress, and the pain is particularly acute in hotels, restaurants and related travel and tourism businesses.

The shelter at home edits of the Federal, state and local governments are literally requesting that people stay at home for the next two weeks. Many hotels have plunged into single-digit occupancies and slashed revenues to cover fixed and operating expenses. Restaurants struggle to see if they can survive on takeout and delivery services alone. Furloughs and layoffs are imminent.

Lenders and borrowers alike are seeking relief, clarity, and resolution. It feels like some blend of the 1990s and 2008. And it is time to go back to the basics or distressed loans: Quick assessment, preparation of plans, transparency, communication, and cooperation for mutual benefit.

The lawyers who comprise JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® have extensive experience and resources that can help hotel stakeholders answer these questions. The issues involved are too numerous to address in one article, and the answers will vary widely depending on each hotel asset and how it is structured.

Today’s article will address how the “structure” of hotel ownership and operations impact the interests of the various stakeholders.

  
Coronavirus: Creative strategies to mitigate financial impact
Loan defaults, lender rights & recapitalizations
by
Jim Butler and Guy Maisnik
JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group®

 

Facing the realities of low hotel occupancy and dwindling operating revenue

Lenders, equity providers, borrowers and operators are facing hard realities regarding the performance of their hospitality assets due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

What are the parties’ rights? What remedies can be pursued? What is the best approach for both the short term and the long term?

Understanding the structure of the hotel asset will help stakeholders answer these difficult questions.

The “operating business” is key

It is often said that hotels are a special real estate asset with an operating business. It really is the other way around: hotels should be thought of as a unique operating business first, within special purpose real estate. This is true not just for hotels, but for assets like timeshares, casinos, gasoline stations, movie theaters, and restaurants. The operating business comprises a large component of the asset’s value.

It is also the operating business that raises thorny problems when cash flow drops dramatically due to matters outside the control of any party – such as a global pandemic or a declaration of national emergency.

Identify and work with all stakeholders

It would be a serious mistake for any stakeholder to believe it holds all the cards in directing the final outcome on asset direction following a calamity. CONTINUE READING →

Published on:

24 January 2020

If you’re planning to attend the 2020 ALIS conference next week, we’d like to hear from you! Our Global Hospitality Group® attorneys are ready to discuss:

  • Successful hotel purchase strategies
  • Getting a great hotel management agreement
  • Optimizing your financing structure
  • Avoiding regulatory pitfalls in 2020
  • How to protect your company and comply with new cybersecurity regulations
  • Hotel industry litigation issues

Please contact us if you’d like to get in touch during the conference:

jim-150x150Jim Butler
Partner, Chairman
Global Hospitality Group®
310.201.3526
JButler@jmbm.com
guy-150x150Guy Maisnik
Partner, Vice Chair
Global Hospitality Group®
310.201.3588
MGM@jmbm.com
david-150x150David A. Sudeck
Partner
310.201.3518
DSudeck@jmbm.com
bob-150x150Robert E. Braun
Partner
310.785.5331
RBraun@jmbm.com
jeff-150x150Jeffrey T. Myers
Partner
310.201.3525
JMyers@jmbm.com
mark-150x150Mark S. Adams
Partner
949.623.7230
MarkAdams@jmbm.com
Published on:

10 May 2019

LOS ANGELES—Jim Butler, Chairman of JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group®, along with Jack Westergom of Manhattan Hospitality Advisors, will speak at the 4th Annual West Institutional Real Estate Investor Forum on June 5, 2019 in San Francisco on the topic of hotel investment. They will also conduct a roundtable discussion for investors who may be new to the hotel investment.

“Many institutional investors, family offices and other sophisticated real estate investors are looking to hotels to increase investment returns. While hotel investments can offer significantly higher cap rates and greater long-term profits, many investors realize they need experienced advisors to avoid pitfalls that might otherwise confront them,” said Butler. “This program will provide an introduction and guide to hotel investments for those looking into how this asset class fits into an investor’s portfolio.”

The morning presentation is entitled, “Time for a second look at Hotels: The hidden gem of asset classes.” It will cover the following:

  • Fundamentals of hotel investment
  • 3 reasons investors buy or build hotels
  • What makes hotels different
  • How much of a hotel’s value is due to the operating business
  • Which hotel agreements have the most impact on value. How much impact?
  • Who are the critical members of your hotel team
  • Case studies for hotel investment – greater upside if done well, greater downside if done badly
  • Why you should let experience be your guide CONTINUE READING →
Published on:

24 April 2019

LOS ANGELES—JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® will host Meet the Money® national hotel finance and investment conference May 6-8 at the Hyatt Regency LAX in Los Angeles.  Now in its 29th year, this annual event will bring together hotel owners, operators, developers, consultants, investors, brands, lenders and other capital providers to discuss current developments in the industry as well as strategies for the future.

“Our line-up of more than 70 speakers include top hospitality leaders who will share their expertise and deliver essential information for maximizing potential opportunities,” said Jim Butler, Chairman of JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group®. “Attendees will also have the opportunity to meet some of the most active capital providers in the market for both existing and new hotel construction,” he said.

Free to all who register is a special pre-conference session on Monday afternoon May 6th – Meet The Equity: Investment Bootcamp – Preparing and Executing the Capital Raise. This interactive workshop will be led by Jonathan Falik of JF Capital Advisors, Guy Maisnik, Vice Chair of JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group®, and private equity experts who will explain how they evaluate requests for capital, what makes certain deals attractive to them, and why they reject projects.

Some of this year’s panel discussions and special presentations, include:

  • Views from the Executive Suite: What’s Important Now?
  • Creative Financing: Mezz and Beyond
  • Is Select Service Still Everyone’s Favorite? Where Does it Go from Here?
  • Developing, Redeveloping and Repositioning to Optimize Value
  • Winning Strategies for Buying and Selling Hotels
  • Construction Financing Today

“Our speakers are passionate about the hospitality industry and we look forward to the enthusiastic exchange of ideas that happens every year at Meet the Money,” said Butler. “We look forward to seeing our long-time industry friends and making new ones.”

Registration can be made through the Meet the Money® website. CONTINUE READING →

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